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Regulatory Issues - Asia

(last updated 18 Nov 2020)

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> See also Issues for: New Mining Projects · Operating Mines · Decommissioning Projects
> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

India   flag


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India allows mining of 'atomic minerals' in fragile coastal regions

Citing "public interest", the environment ministry has relaxed guidelines for mining of critical atomic minerals like uranium in fragile coastal regions, even if such minerals are found elsewhere.
Experts said the decision signalled a significant shift in government policy and opened up fragile coastal areas to mining, potentially increasing the vulnerability of fast-eroding coastal stretches of the country.
A total of 11 atomic minerals are covered under the latest notification. Some of them are beryl, lithium, rare-earth minerals containing uranium and thorium, niobium, phosphorites and other phosphatic ores containing uranium and thorium minerals. Titanium-bearing minerals, tantallium-bearing minerals and zirconium-bearing minerals are also included. (Livemint Oct. 12, 2017)

 

India to open uranium mining up to private sector

Balvinder Kumar, secretary in the mines ministry, said the government plans to usher in competition in the leasing process. The government, like it did with hydrocarbons, is set to open up exploration and production of atomic minerals to private mining companies. (Livemint June 14, 2016)

 


Indonesia   flag


> See also Issues for: New Mining Projects · Operating Mines · Decommissioning Projects
> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

Export of uranium-containing tailings from Indonesia to China taking place unregulated since 2005

The coal tailings left over crushed rocks from West Kalimantan are known to contain precious minerals, among which is a significant amount of zirconium. Tailings, usually considered as waste, turn out to be degradable into radioactive materials, such as uranium and thorium, and into gold. This degradation technology is possessed by South Africa among which. With the potential of such valuable materials, export for such tailings should be regulated. This was stated by Aries Kelana from the The Nuclear Energy Supervisory Board (Bapeten) during the Bapeten executive meeting with Jakarta's licensed radiation protection program and radioactive source security, last Thursday (Dec. 3). The tailings according to Aries, since 2005 have been exported to China at the price of Rp. 200/kg [US$ 0.021/kg]. However, if the zirconium is processed into uranium and torium the value could be 20 times higher.
According to Bapeten head As Natio Lasman, among the mined materials there are valuable side products, for instance in lead mining rare valuable metals can also be found, such as uranium and thorium. However, he regrets that so far there has been no regulation to monitor these or to prohibit them from being taken. Ideally, the side products should be set aside on a different pile, as is done in Malaysian lead mines. According to As Natio his institution will endeavor for a legal premise to regulate mines containing uranium and torium. The drafting of this regulation would involve all related institutions. (Kompass Dec. 7, 2009)

 


Jordan   flag


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> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

Jordan's regulations governing nuclear safety to be ready by year-end

The Jordan Nuclear Regulatory Commission (JNCR) on Sunday (July 11) said it will finish drafting 26 regulations to govern nuclear safety in the Kingdom by the end of the year. JNRC Director Jamal Sharaf told The Jordan Times yesterday that the commission will present the regulations to the Cabinet by the end of the year, in order to have all regulatory frameworks related to securing and monitoring nuclear and radioactive materials in place.
The new legislation will include specific articles on regulation - from personal safety to the environment - to ensure proper handling and security of nuclear materials. The law will come into effect ahead of major milestones in the Kingdom's peaceful nuclear programme, such as the sub-critical assembly of the nuclear research reactor in Irbid, estimated to begin within two years, and uranium mining, expected to commence in 2012. (Jordan Times July 12, 2010)

Jordan completes draft uranium mining bylaw

The Jordan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC) announced on Sunday (July 5) the completion of a draft bylaw governing the mining of nuclear materials in the Kingdom. The bylaw takes into consideration several issues including the impact of mining on the environment and local communities, transportation of nuclear material as well as the safety of workers in order to ensure uranium is explored and extracted in a safe and responsible manner, the Jordan News Agency, Petra, reported.
The Jordan Nuclear Regulatory Commission will complete procedures for the bylaw by forwarding it to the Cabinet ahead of work to extract and mine uranium by companies working in Jordan, according to the commission. JAEC Commissioner for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Ned Xoubi said the bylaw is in line with international standards and is modelled after the International Atomic Energy Agency's instructions and bylaws on extracting and mining uranium, as is currently being followed in countries such as Canada and Australia, according to Petra. (Jordan Times July 6, 2009)

 


Kazakhstan   flag


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> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

Norwegian Radiation Protection Agency identifies regulatory problems with the management of the uranium mining legacy and radioactive waste in Central Asian countries

> Download: Norwegian Support to Regulatory Authorities in Central Asia in Radioactive Waste Management, Final report for activities in 2008-2012 , StrålevernRapport 2013:8, Norwegian Radiation Protection Agency, Østerås 2013 (970kB PDF)
With the support of the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority has developed projects on a bilateral basis with the aim of assisting the regulatory bodies in Central Asian countries identify gaps in the regulatory framework and draft relevant regulatory requirements to ensure the protection of personnel, the public and the environment during the planning and conducting of remedial action with regard to past practices and measures for radioactive waste management and uranium legacy.

> Download: Threat Assessment Report, Regulatory Aspects of the Remediation and Rehabilitation of Nuclear Legacy in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan , StrålevernRapport 2011:5, Norwegian Radiation Protection Agency, Østerås 2011 (5MB PDF)
Based upon the completion of the threat assessments in each Central Asian country this document focuses on the existing regulatory problems at the legacy sites and projects will address the regulatory documents which should be developed within the project framework.

 

Kazakhstan prepared to supply uranium to India

India and Kazakhstan are expected to engage in joint extraction of natural uranium in this central Asian country after the two sides conclude the proposed inter-governmental agreement for cooperation in peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The two sides have signed a memorandum envisaging cooperation in "joint extraction of natural uranium in Kazakhstan" apart from delivery of fuel for reactors in India, Mukhtar Dzhakishev, President of the National Atomic company Kazatomprom was quoted as saying by 'Khabar' news agency. (The Hindu Feb. 4, 2009)

Kazatomprom and Nuclear Power Corp. of India Ltd (NPCIL) have signed a declaration of intent for cooperation on nuclear energy. (RIA Novosti Jan. 24, 2009)

State-run Nuclear Power Corp. of India Ltd, or NPCIL, will enter into a nuclear cooperation pact with Kazakhstan's state-owned Kazatomprom end January 2009. One of the elements of this agreement is uranium supply from Kazatomprom. (Livemint Jan. 11, 2009)

Kazakhstan is prepared to supply India uranium for its existing and future civil nuclear power plants and in return expects greater intensity in economic ties, including assistance in joining the World Trade Organisation (WTO). An agreement to promote nuclear cooperation between the two countries could be agreed upon during a summit meeting between Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev. (The Hindu Oct. 16, 2008)

 


Mongolia   flag


> See also Issues for: New Mining Projects · Operating Mines · Decommissioning Projects
> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

EU seeks contractor for elaboration of regulatory framework for uranium mining and milling in Mongolia

> View Mongolia-Ulan Bator: NSI -- Establishment of a regulatory framework for uranium mines and milling operations in Mongolia -- MN3.01/11, Request For Proposals , Oct. 22, 2013

Mongolia gets EU aid for environmental monitoring of uranium mining

The EuropeAid development and cooperation department of the European Commission has provided Mongolia with 2.5 million euros in aid for a three-year project related to uranium exploitation in Central Asia, local media reported on Monday (July 4). The project involves the monitoring of radioactive substances and chemical pollution of water, the training of specialists on radioactive protection, environmental recovery, and the improvement of technologies to determine emissions of alpha, beta and gamma rays. The project will also establish a database on exploited uranium in Central Asia. (Xinhua July 4, 2011)

 


Nepal   flag


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> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

Nuclear bill introduced in Nepal parliament to regulate uranium mining and processing

A hasty push for endorsement of the 'nuclear bill' in the parliament is being made amidst rumors of the discovery of uranium mines near trans-Himalayan terrain of Lo Mangthang of Mustang district. In fact, Office of Investment Board's website claims that "a large deposit of uranium has been discovered in Upper Mustang region of Nepal... spread over an area 10 km long and 3 km wide and could be of highest grade. These findings have also been confirmed by the International Atomic Energy Agency." The bill, tabled by Ministry of Education, Science and Technology , unabashedly grants permission to uranium mining, enrichment and all steps of nuclear fuel cycle, import and export of uranium, plutonium and its isotopes, and use Nepal as transit for storage of the nuclear and radio-active substances. (My Republica Apr. 23, 2019)

 


Kyrgyzstan   flag


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> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

Kyrgyz president signs law banning uranium exploration and mining

President of Kyrgyzstan Sooronbai Jeenbekov signed a decree banning the mining of uranium and thorium deposits in the Central Asian country, his press service reported on Monday (Dec. 16). The law, aimed at ensuring radiation and environmental safety, prohibits geological exploration and development of uranium and thorium deposits in Kyrgyzstan, as well as dumping and transfer of the material, the report said. Meanwhile, the import of raw materials and waste containing the two radioactive substances is not allowed by law, it said. (Xinhua Dec. 16, 2019)
The law has entered into force 15 days after its signing (December 16). (AKIpress Jan. 2, 2020)

Kyrgyz parliament passes bill banning uranium exploration and mining

Draft law banning geological exploration and mining of uranium and thorium deposits in Kyrgyzstan passed the [final] third reading at the parliament on October 31.
The bill proposes to ban any geological exploration and mining of uranium and thorium deposits, as well as development of radioactive tailings and waste dumps, as well as their transfer to individuals for further development and maintenance. The draft law also proposes to ban import of uranium- and thorium-containing raw materials and waste. (AKIpress Oct. 31, 2019)

Kyrgyz Prime Minister bans exploration and mining of uranium before legal response

Prime Minister of Kyrgyzstan Muhamedkaliy Abilgaziyev signed order banning geological exploration and mining of uranium on the licensed deposits before the legal response. The ban does not apply to the reclamation of uranium tailings and dumps, the statement said. (AKIpress June 3, 2019)

Association of Miners and Geologists supports uranium ban in Kyrgyzstan [!]

The chairman of the Association of Miners and Geologists of Kyrgyzstan Orozbek Duisheev on May 7 supported the initiative to ban uranium deposits in Kyrgyzstan. He said this at a public hearing on the draft law "On the introduction of a moratorium on licensing activities related to the right to use subsoil resources for geological prospecting, exploration and development of uranium deposits in the Kyrgyz Republic". (Tazabek May 7, 2019)

Kyrgyzstan's parliament bans uranium exploration and mining after protests

Kyrgyzstan's parliament voted on Thursday (May 2) to ban uranium exploration and mining in the Central Asian nation despite previously issuing licenses to foreign companies such as Canada's Azarga Uranium. The move, which may expose the Bishkek government to compensation claims from foreign investors, followed a series of public protests against plans to develop the Kyzyl Ompul project in which Azarga has a stake. "Parliament has taken a historic decision... Uranium mining will be prohibited," speaker Dastan Jumabekov told the legislature after Thursday's vote by which it ordered the government to draft the necessary bills to enforce the ban.
The only exception will be made for the reprocessing of waste in Soviet-era tailings. (Reuters May 2, 2019)

 

Norwegian Radiation Protection Agency identifies regulatory problems with the management of the uranium mining legacy and radioactive waste in Central Asian countries

> View here

 

Kyrgyzstan accepted as EITI compliant country

On March 1, 2011, the Kyrgyz Republic has been accepted as an Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) compliant country. The EITI sets a global standard for companies to publish what they pay and for governments to disclose what they receive.
> View EITI release Mar. 2, 2011
> View EITI: Kyrgyz Republic

 


Tajikistan   flag


> See also Issues for: New Mining Projects · Operating Mines · Decommissioning Projects
> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

Norwegian Radiation Protection Agency identifies regulatory problems with the management of the uranium mining legacy and radioactive waste in Central Asian countries

> View here

 


Uzbekistan   flag


> See also Issues for: New Mining Projects · Operating Mines · Decommissioning Projects
> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

Norwegian Radiation Protection Agency identifies regulatory problems with the management of the uranium mining legacy and radioactive waste in Central Asian countries

> View here

 


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